The Importance of Book Reviews for Authors

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Getting book reviews is vital for recently published authors. There are two main benefits to having your work reviewed: public presence and social credibility.

 

When your manuscript is complete, you might send it off to an agent or publisher. Alternatively, you may decide to self-publish. Either way, you will need book publicity to gain attention from your target audience, so that people actually buy it and read it.

 

After publication, the fear sets in. What if nobody reads it? Or even worse, what if people read it and everyone hates it? Realistically, if your book is worth publishing, there’s somebody out there who will think it’s worth reading and even paying money for. You need to make sure they know it exists.

 

Gaining presence in the world of booklovers comes about by people talking about your book. It’s a promotion for you, even if they aren’t saying nice things, at least they know your name and the title of your book. If you get people talking about your book online, it will generate more interest and a lot of people will read the book just to see what all the hype is about. So, although positive book reviews are better, any type of mention can help you out with sales and presence.

 

The other reason book reviews are so important for authors is that it gives you social credibility. When other authors support your writing, all of their fans may potentially become yours. Even getting book bloggers or general readers to discuss your work is valuable. It shows people that other people are reading your book, not just your high school English teacher. They have read it and they cared enough about it to tell the world what they thought. The majority of them will be fair, albeit subjective, in their comments, which means you will probably accumulate a decent number of favorable statements to use in your public relations campaign.

 

Of course, it’s a lot of work to get a bunch of reviewers to write about your work, especially if you’d much rather be writing your next book or taking a well-earned vacation. The submission process is different for each blogger and figuring out how to get a hold of published authors is even more complicated and time-consuming, but it’s worth the effort. Having that credibility and public presence will give you the edge you need to succeed in the publishing world. Once a few people mention your name, the word will get passed around.

 

The crux of the matter is that when people are talking about you, it means your book publicity is working. Publicity helps increase book sales, and book reviews are one key way to make those sales happen.

 

Self-Published Authors Need to Create a Community

WritingThe playing field has been leveled for aspiring authors. No longer do you have to send out dozens of queries and wait months to receive a rejection notice. Authors now have the power to go directly to the source and self-publish. Self-publishing has allowed authors to bypass big name publishing houses and press agents, but what some fail to realize is all that responsibility is now in their hands. It can feel overwhelming for a first time author.
Some authors have the mindset that all they want to do is write. Unfortunately, those days are over for most authors, especially those that are new self-published authors. The biggest thing you must do as a self-published author is create a community of “fans.” It may be two people when you first begin, but it has to be people that are passionate about your work. There are so many books being released that it is tough to get publicity and carve out a niche to get yourself noticed. This is where your fans can begin to help you out. They will become your public relations managers and help spread the word on how great your book is.
Developing your base:
You must have a place where your fans can gather and get access to you. If you’re a self-published author who wants to stay out of the spotlight, you have a better chance of hitting the lottery than having a best-selling book. You must be on the frontline engaging with each of your readers. Let them get to know you and really allow them to see who you are.
A blog or a website is going to be your “home-base.” This is where your readers will be able to get updates and samples of all your latest works, and most importantly have access to you to start creating that bond.
Social Media:
As you are establishing your blog or website, you need to start adding social media platforms. Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and YouTube are the biggest out there right now. Each site is unique so make sure you get a feel for the proper procedures before you dive in. Once you feel comfortable, it’s all about how you can help your readers. What problems can you solve for your readers that will make them interested in your work? Once they become interested and buy your book, then you want to add them to your army of PR advocates who are also your fans.
Self-published authors need to be on the front-line of any successful public relations campaign. Engaging with readers and building a community of fans is essential. Ideally, this plan needs to be put in place well before your book is released. However, most self-published authors are learning as they go so if you already have a book out it’s okay. Just realize you are starting from ground zero and it will take some time to build a solid platform of followers.

Promoting a Self-Published Book

Open BookThis article gives some low or zero-cost ways self-published authors can successfully promote their books and increase sales.

 

If you have self-published a book, you have likely learned that getting a book published is only half of the work. There are millions of books available to readers, who have only so much time and money to spend on them. The challenge is figuring out how to promote your self-published book so readers become interested and spend their hard-earned money on it.

 

Perhaps one of the biggest challenges in promoting your self-published book is if you do not have thousands of dollars or more to spend on hiring a professional to promote it. Still, you can market your book successfully without spending very much money at all. Later, as your book’s sales increase, you can then use the money you earn to increase the marketing efforts for your book.

 

Here are six low-cost things you can start doing today to promote your self-published book:

 

1. Start with family and friends. Promoting your self-published book requires you to not be shy about sharing your work. This is no time for humility, but at the same time you need to not be annoying. Your friends and family have an interest in seeing you succeed, and they are a ready-made support base for promoting your book. Talk to them about your book, and even consider giving them free copies. Encourage them to post reviews of your book online, to talk to their friends about it and do anything else they can think of to spread the word.

 

2. Leverage social media sites. Social media allows you to connect to other people from across the globe, spreading your influence even further without spending any money. Set up a Facebook page for you as a writer, or consider setting up a page for your book, and then invite your Facebook friends to like the page. Use Twitter to connect with other writers and to reach people with interests that relate to your book. Register on Goodreads and encourage your friends on there to read and review your book. Connect with people who have interests relating to your book’s topic by joining groups on different social media sites. For example, if your book is about gardening, find out what gardening groups exist and join them. Do not just talk about your book on these groups, but actually participate in the conversations going on in the group. Mention your book occasionally, or to include a blurb about it in your signature every time you post a comment.

 

3. Never underestimate the power of local support to promote your book. Seek out local bookstores in your area. Avoid marching into a bookstore and just hawking your book to the owner though. Get to know the store beforehand, frequenting it on a regular basis so you get to know the culture behind the store. Many independent bookstores have their own quirks that appeal to their customers, so if you can make your book mesh with those quirks you have a better shot of getting it placed with the bookstore. Also, getting to know the workers and owner as a customer helps selling them on your book.

 

4. Look into non-book stores. The fact of the matter is that a good portion of book sales take place outside of bookstores. Market your self-published book by placing it with other local stores, especially ones that sell things which relate to your book. If your book is about cooking, even if it is a work of fiction, place it with some local kitchenware stores, or even independent restaurants. In general, local gift shops, grocery stores and pharmacies also might be interested in carrying your book, especially if it has good mass appeal.

 

5. Further market your book by convincing book clubs to choose it as their next book selection. This requires you actively seek out local book clubs, which you can find listed on the Internet or at local bookstores. Offer to go speak to the book clubs when they discuss your book, giving extra incentive for the club to choose your book. Members of the book club also inevitably will end up mentioning your book to other people, increasing your marketing efforts and your book sales.

 

6. Donate two or more copies of your book to local libraries. Your book marketing plan can reach a whole new level if people who are well-read like your book. Many people who read high amounts of books frequent libraries, since they cannot afford to buy every book they read. These people often are go-to sources for other people who are looking for a good book to read. If library users have read and like your book, they likely will recommend it to others who value their opinion.
Many people who have written a self-published book see dismal sales because they don’t know how to promote their book. These people often think they need spent lots of money for marketing, advertising, and public relations, but as you can see, there are plenty of low-cost things you can do to promote your book yourself to increase sales.

New Sports Fiction Book Helps Kids Exercise Their Minds

The Hoop Kid from Elmdale ParkLOS ANGELES, CA (January, 7, 2014) – As college basketball’s most exciting and serious time of year [March Madness] approaches, Elmdale Park Brand founder Teko Bernard hopes to encourage young basketball fans to read more for fun with his new book, The Hoop Kid from Elmdale Park.
“Kids devote a lot of their time to sports participation these days, and it can get pretty hectic and serious,” says Teko. “I wrote this book to help fill the need for fun, sports themed fiction books for active kids who love sports but are reluctant to read. I hope to inspire sports-minded kids to reach for a book more often to exercise their minds.”
According to Nickelodeon Kids and Family Research, almost 50% of kids ages 7 to 14 play sports 3 to 4 days a week during their sports seasons. Most kids seem to be participating in 2 to 3 organized sports in a year.
Kids who read for pleasure are likely to do significantly better at school than their peers. The Institute of Education found that children who read for pleasure made more progress in math, vocabulary and spelling between the ages of 10 and 16 than those who rarely read.
The Hoop Kid from Elmdale Park is a fun, upbeat story dealing with themes of courage, teamwork, and overcoming defeat. The length and pace of the book was created with the reluctant reader in mind. The occasional cartoon like illustrations add a fun break while reading.
In The Hoop Kid from Elmdale Park, all Bernard Jones wanted to do while staying with his grandparents for the summer in Elmdale, was work on his basketball skills. When Bernard excitedly enters a team into the Annual Elmdale Park Basketball Tournament, he’s shocked to discover that the future of the park is at stake. The town of Elmdale hasn’t won the tournament in 20 years, and Victor Franco, a ruthless millionaire, is planning to shut down the annual tournament for good and turn the historic Elmdale Park into a landfill for his own profit. It can all be stopped if Bernard and his team, the Elmdale Warriors, win the tournament this year. Can the courageous Bernard and his fun and wacky crew defeat their Oakdale rivals and save the historic Park?
The Hoop Kid from Elmdale Park is available on Amazon.
The Hoop Kid from Elmdale Park
By Teko Bernard
Age Range: 8 and up
Grade Level: 3 and up
Paperback: 126 pages
Publisher: Elmdale Park Books
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0986059307
ISBN-13: 978-0986059308
To learn more, visit: http://www.hoopkidonline.com
For media inquiries, please contact Book Publicity Services at info@bookpublicityservices.com
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