Recipes and Road Stories by Hannah Melby and Caroline Melby

Hanalena Recipes and Road Stories book coverRecipes and Road Stories: From Life on the Road with Sisters Hannah and Caroline Melby of the duo HanaLena, published by Sartoris Literary Group, was released in September 2014 and is available for sale on Amazon. Genres: Non-Fiction / Memoir / Cookbook
By the time Hannah was in the 11th grade and Caroline was in the 7th grade, the Melby sisters were touring the country in bluegrass bands, with Hannah on fiddle and Caroline on mandolin. Today the sisters are the front persons of a very popular Nashville-based country music touring band named HanaLena.
Do they ever have some great stories to tell about coming of age on the concert trail!
Recipes and Road Stories blends touching and rollicking road stories with an assortment of tasty recipes, and then tops everything off with plenty of exciting photographs.
Also contributing recipes are friends they made on the road, including Rhonda Vincent, a 5-time Grammy nominee who has been called the “Queen of Bluegrass,” and Claire Lynch, who is the reigning Female Vocalist of the Year for the International Bluegrass Association.
The sisters, who grew up in Starkville, Mississippi, performed from an early age—Hannah is now 28, Caroline is 24—evolving from bluegrass to progressive country as they perfected their songwriting and performance skills out on the road. In 2008 they won the “Best New Act in Country Music” competition at the Colgate Showdown in the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville—and took home a check for a cool $100,000 presented by country music star LeAnn Rimes.
In their off-hours, the sisters focused on the business end of music, with Hannah receiving a degree in public relations from Mississippi State University and Caroline receiving a degree in music business from Belmont University in Nashville.
“Hannah and Caroline remind me so much of the Dixie Chicks,” says SLG president James L. Dickerson, whose biography Dixie Chicks: Down-Home and Backstage, was the first in-depth analysis of that group’s road to success. “Their musicianship is superb—and they have the grit, vision and good humor to make it to the top.”

 

Excerpt from Recipes and Road Stories:
A High Lonesome Cowboy Wedding Never to Forget
This is one of our favorite stories. It is dear to our hearts, but it is a hard story to tell for reasons that soon will become apparent.
It was a hot summer day in Mississippi. We drove for hours from Nashville, down to Sallis, Mississippi, located outside of the “big city” of Kosciusko. Once we arrived in Sallis, we turned down a winding, gravel road that led us to an old high school gym.
We unpacked our gear for what we thought would be a typical wedding. What we didn’t know was this would be anything but a typical wedding, and it would probably change all of our lives a little, even if we didn’t know it at the time.
We were greeted by a handful of handsome boys dressed in heavily starched white shirts and jeans. They had matching tan cowboy hats to top off the outfit. They helped us carry our sound equipment into the small, but inviting gym that had been transformed into a beautiful wedding venue.
The groom stepped up and introduced himself with a firm, good ole boy handshake that made you feel like the world would be in good hands with him. The bride was a beautiful mother of five with a smile as wide and bright as if she had won the lottery.
We set up for the ceremony and got ready to perform. But before the wedding began we all gathered around to say a prayer. It was a well-spoken and beautiful prayer, the kind that made you feel like God was watching over the couple at that very moment.
When the wedding began, we played “Ashokan Farewell” as the doors opened and the bride began her long walk to meet her husband at the altar. As she began that journey, she was accompanied by one of her sons who walked at her side. Then after a few steps they paused long enough for another child to replace the first child—and so it went, the bride alternating her children so that each of them ended up walking her closer to her soon-to-be husband.
Something about the togetherness of that moment touched every heart in the room. The bride finally reached the spot where she would change her last name and hopefully her entire life. On either side of the couple were a line of finely dressed boys and girls, each of whom was one of their kids. I say “their kids” because I have never seen a family as close as they were on that day. They didn’t point out whose children were their biological ones. They were a family. That is all they needed.
After the “I dos” and the every so anticipated kiss, they turned and walked down the aisle a second time, but now as husband and wife. We played the reception soon after. They cleared the chairs and got ready for a good ole time! They had their first dance. They looked at each other was with such compassion and adoration. They somehow knew they were supposed to be there together at that very moment.
The bride and groom each danced with the children, one by one. During one song, the bride’s youngest boy walked on stage and pulled on my dress like you would expect any small child to do when he wants to ask a question. I bent down to listen to his request. It was the sweetest and saddest question I have ever heard.
“Would you play a song for my mommy and me?” he asked. “I haven’t danced with her yet and I am afraid she has forgotten about me.”
I hugged him and said you bet!
I’m not sure, but I might have stopped the song we were playing half way through to honor his request. I was so touched by his innocence and his need to have a dance with his mom. As I watched with awe, the bride came over and grabbed her youngest boy from the stage and held him close while she danced with him.
After the last song was played and the last dance was danced, we loaded our instruments into the car and were ready to head home. The boys in starch all came up and gave us their going away present; I believe it was almonds tied up in a red bandana. We had the best time. Before we left we got a big hug from the bride and groom. They told us “thank you” as most people do. But, they decided to tell us why this wedding was so special to them. We knew a little background about them, but nothing prepared us for the story they told.
The bride had lost her husband a little while back.  She was left with five kids. She was doing all she could to hold the family together, but it never seemed like enough. One day she was praying for the Lord to send her a man that would love her and all of her children, and it wouldn’t hurt if he was tall, dark, and handsome. She told God that the man would have to come to her, because she didn’t have any time to go out and search for him.
While she was on her knees praying, one of her daughters came looking for her and told her someone was at the door. She got up with tears in her eyes and opened the door. There stood a man. He was tall, he had dark hair, and he was handsome. He asked her if her husband was there. He had known him a while back and heard he lived here. She invited him in and told him of her late husband’s passing. They talked for hours. His wife had passed away as well.
Shortly after that meeting, they fell in love and got married. God had answered her prayers. He had sent her a tall, dark, and handsome man that loved her and all of her children, and she loved his children as well.
We left the old country place with tears in our eyes and a new-found appreciation for love and an acceptance of the mysterious way God works. We traveled home in silence, reflecting on the life changing day we had experienced.
I wish my story stopped there.
A few months after their wedding, the mother of her five children and of his three, answered a knock at her door. A man was standing there. With a pained look upon his face, he removed his hat.  She knew something was wrong before any words were spoken. He told her he regretted to inform her that her husband’s train had derailed, and that he had not survived the train wreck.
For the second time, her world fell apart. She had to put aside her pain. She had eight children to take care of now, so for the second time, she was forced to become strong. — Hannah 

 

Sample Recipe:
Deep Fried Oreos
Cleek Farms, Kingsport, Tennessee
Host of annual Cleek Farm Corn Maze
1 1/2 cups milk
2 eggs
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
3/4 cup confectioners’ sugar (sift for best results)
8 cups vegetable oil for frying
Mix first 6 ingredients. Heat oil. A deep fryer works great, but you don’t have to use one. Dip the Oreo in the batter, place in fryer until golden brown. Remove, cool slightly, and apply sifted powdered sugar. This is a simple funnel cake mix.

 

To learn more about HanaLena, go to http://nashstreet.com/. For further information, to request a review copy of Recipes and Road Stories, or to interview Hannah and Caroline Melby, please contact Kelsey McBride at info@bookpublicityservices.com or 805.807.9027.

5 Tips for Creating Memorable Characters for Your Novel

booksMany writers struggle with character development, and it is sometimes one of the main sources of writer’s block. Here are some tips for creating characters that make an impression and a strong work of fiction:
1. Work Backwards
Brian Kiteley, author of The 3 AM Epiphany and The 4 AM Breakthrough creates practice exercises for writing, using restrictions or pre-planned scenes to explore character creation and development. Try outlining a specific situation, mapping a character’s reaction and building your characterization based on how or why they react in that scene
2. Show, Don’t Tell
This is a tip that you will get from everyone from college professors to best-selling authors. Rather than telling your readers about a character, let them figure it out. Animate them. Make them real. Show what they are wearing by describing the sound their shoes make on the tile or what they look like by their reflection in a store window. Spending pages on character description will drive readers crazy.
3. Draw Inspiration from Real Life
Virginia Woolf said in her essay Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown that practicing character reading and development does not have to be about creating experiences that are outside of the realm of daily life, but simply learning to “live a single year of life without disaster.” Learn people, study their accents, their reactions, their habits, and create characters based on things you might see every day. This allows your readers to easily envision your characters and connect with them.
4. Do Not Be Afraid to Stray from Reality
This tip seems contradictory to #3, but it is important not to stifle your creativity. In an interview with Amazon, JK Rowling explained her own experience with this:
“Mostly, real people inspire a character, but once they are inside your head they start turning into something quite different. Professor Snape and Gilderoy Lockhart both started as exaggerated versions of people I’ve met, but became rather different once I got them on the page”
Remember to allow for your imagination to run freely, even if you are using reality for inspiration. It is okay if your original ideas do not pan out; sometimes, that process creates the best fiction.
5. Get to Know Your Characters
Ask yourself questions about them. What do they eat for breakfast? What is their favorite way to spend free time? What are their flaws and deepest secrets? You should know your character better than you know yourself and be able to explain their actions, reactions, feelings, and desires. That is the only way to create characters that make an impression and keep readers wanting more.

The Coming Woman by Karen J. Hicks Is Now Available For Sale

The Coming Woman book coverFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE (LAS VEGAS, NV) – Karen J. Hicks announced today that her latest novel The Coming Woman, published by Sartoris Literary Group, is now available for sale on Amazon and Barnes & Noble. The Coming Woman is a novel based on the life of feminist Victoria Woodhull, the first woman to run for U.S. President, 50 years before women could even vote!
On April 2, 1870, readers of the New York Herald open their newspapers to an astonishing headline: “The Coming Woman, Victoria C. Woodhull, to race for the White House!” And so begins the story of power, politics, promiscuity, and persecution surrounding one of the most fascinating and controversial women in American history.
Reactions to Victoria’s announcement are mostly amused. After all, women can’t even vote!  But she and her sister already mix it up with the men on Wall Street, running the first woman-owned and run brokerage firm, and now she launches the first successful mainstream newspaper to be run by a woman.  When she becomes the first woman to enter the bastion of male dominance, the House Judiciary Committee, her argument that the 14th and 15th Amendments already give women the vote stuns the men and electrifies the women!
As her power and influence grow, the male-dominated media attacks.  Victoria counters the assaults by becoming bolder, urging women to revolt—even to secede—if they are not recognized as citizens. Such radical views, combined with her political ambitions, stir up controversy, but she will not be deterred.
On May 10, 1872, the Equal Rights Party officially nominates her as its Presidential candidate, with former-slave-turned-statesman Frederick Douglass as her V.P. If she thought she was persecuted before, it is nothing compared to what follows…
“What kind of confidence would it take for a woman to buck the old boy’s club of politics in 1872?  More than 140 years pre-Hillary, there was Victoria Woodhull.  This book takes you back with a breathtaking, present-tense bird’s eye view into a time when women’s liberation was primarily confined to one woman’s very capable, independent mind.  I couldn’t put it down.” – Ruth Buzzi, Comedienne, Entertainer
To learn more, go to http://www.karenjhicks.com/. For further information, to request a review copy of The Coming Woman, or to interview Karen Hicks, please contact Kelsey McBride at info@bookpublicityservices.com or 805.807.9027.
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Oliver Sparrow’s Latest Novel ‘Dark Sun, Bright Moon’ Is Now Available For Sale

Dark Sun, Bright Moon by Oliver SparrowAugust 20, 2014 (Los Angeles, CA) – Oliver Sparrow announced that his latest novel Dark Sun, Bright Moon is now available for sale on Amazon and Barnes & Noble. In it, he explores a nation and people he studied during his time in Peru, transforming his travels and extensive research in the Peruvian jungle into a fictional novel about the same land a thousand years ago.
“Dark Sun, Bright Moon describes people isolated in the Andes, without the least notion of outsiders. They evolve an understanding of the universe that is complementary to our own but a great deal wider. The book explores events of a thousand years ago, events which fit with what we know of the region’s history,” says Sparrow.
In the Andes of a thousand years ago, the Huari empire is sick. Its communities are being eaten from within by a plague, a contagion that is not of the body but of something far deeper, a plague that has taken their collective spirit. Rooting out this parasite is a task that is laid upon Q’ilyasisa, a young woman from an obscure little village on the forgotten borders of the Huari empire.
This impossible mission is imposed on her by a vast mind, a sentience that has ambitions to shape all human life. Her response to this entails confrontations on sacrificial pyramids, long journeys through the Amazonian jungle and the establishment of not just one but two new empires. Her legacy shapes future Andean civilization for the next four hundred years, until the arrival of the Spanish.
Dark Sun, Bright Moon takes the reader on a fascinating adventure that includes human sacrifice, communities eaten from within, a vast mind blazing under the mud of Lake Titicaca, and the rise and fall of empires cruel and kind.
About the Author: Oliver Sparrow was born in the Bahamas, raised in Africa and educated at Oxford to post-doctorate level, as a biologist with a strong line in computer science. He spent the majority of his working life with Shell, the oil company, which took him into the Peruvian jungle for the first time. He has started numerous companies, one of them in Peru, which mines for gold. This organization funded a program of photographing the more accessible parts of Peru, and the results can be seen at http://www.all-peru.info. Oliver knows modern Peru very well, and has visited all of the physical sites that are described in his book Dark Sun, Bright Moon.To learn more, go to http://www.darksunbrightmoon.com/
For further information, to request a review copy of Dark Sun, Bright Moon, or to interview Oliver Sparrow, please contact Kelsey McBride at info@bookpublicityservices.com or 805.807.9027.
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Author Steven Wells Hicks Announces Book Signing in Jackson, Mississippi

Destiny's Anvil Book CoverAugust 19, 2014 (Jackson, Mississippi) – Steven Wells Hicks announces his farewell book signing and reading today, as he prepares to move to New Orleans after 40 years in Jackson. The signing will begin at 5:00PM, with the reading at 5:30PM at Lemuria Books.
Hicks’ novel, Destiny’s Anvil: A Tale of Politics, Payback & Pigs, was written from an insider’s experiences in the back rooms of hardball Dixie politics where cold-blooded payback is coin of the realm. Destiny’s Anvil is at once a sharp-eyed examination of the seamy underside of America’s elections and a freewheeling yarn in the grand Southern tradition.
“Destiny’s Anvil is written for readers who look for fast-paced tales of icy revenge, but also like the combination of patrician gentility and regional quirkiness that so defines the upper classes of the American South,” says Hicks.
Hicks’ fourth novel, Destiny’s Anvil is the polar opposite of the novel’s original intent. It is dark, violent bordering on savage, as it strips away the veneers of not only politicians, but the entire American political system. At the same time, it moves with the furious pace of a thriller overflowing with cliffhangers.
Of his last book signing in Jackson, Hicks says, “After forty years here, this is my ‘farewell appearance’ before moving to New Orleans.” To learn more, go to http://stevenwellshicks.com/.
Lemuria Books is located at 4465 N Hwy 55 #202, Jackson, MS 39206. For more information, visit http://www.lemuriabooks.com/index.php?show=events
Destiny’s Anvil is available for sale on Amazon in ebook and paperback.
For further information, to request a review copy, or to set up an interview or appearance by Steven Wells Hicks, contact Kelsey McBride at info@bookpublicityservices.com or (805) 807-9027.
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The Coming Woman: A Novel Based on the Life of the Infamous Feminist, Victoria Woodhull

The Coming Woman book coverAt a time when Hillary Clinton is considering another run for the presidency, it might be helpful to consider the first woman who ran for president—and at a time when women were prohibited from voting!
The Coming Woman, by Karen J. Hicks, is a novel based on the life of feminist Victoria Woodhull, the first woman to run for U.S. President, 50 years before women could even vote!
Running for President wasn’t Victoria’s only first as a woman. She was also the first to own a successful Wall Street firm, the first to publish a successful national newspaper, and the first to head the two-million-member Spiritualist Association.
She was the first woman to enter the Senate Judiciary Committee chambers to petition for woman’s suffrage, her argument changing the entire focus of the suffragist movement by pointing out that the 14th and 15th Amendments already gave women the vote.
In her campaign for the Presidency, Victoria Woodhull boldly addressed many of the issues we still face today: equal pay for equal work; freedom in love; corporate greed and political corruption fueled by powerful lobbyists; and the increasing disparity between the rich and the poor, to name only a few. Her outspoken and common-sense ideas may shed a new perspective on the parallel conundrums of today’s world.
This bold, beautiful, and sexually progressive woman dared to take on society and religion. To make an example of the hypocrisy in what Mark Twain dubbed The Gilded Age, she exposed the extramarital affairs of the most popular religious figure of the day (Henry Ward Beecher). This led to her persecution and imprisonment and the longest, most infamous trial of the 19th century. But it did not stop her fight for equality.
Victoria’s epic story, set in the late 1800s, comes to life in a modern, fictional style, while staying true to the actual words and views of the many well-known characters.
The Coming Woman was published by Sartoris Literary Group in August 2014 and is available for sale on Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Genre: Women’s Fiction / Historical Fiction

 

Praise for The Coming Woman:
“Sadly, too many Americans have never heard of Victoria Woodhull, let alone learned of her story: her revolutionary campaign for the presidency at a time when women weren’t even allowed to vote, her support for worker’s rights, or her feminist commitment to equality, a century before the official battle over the Equal Rights Amendment. But in ‘The Coming Woman,’ Karen Hicks brings Woodhull’s efforts to life, and reminds us that some of our nation’s greatest figures aren’t always featured in the history books. It is a riveting account of an amazing woman and her struggle for justice and human dignity, told in an engaging and eminently readable style.” – Tim Wise, author, White Like Me: Reflections on Race from a Privileged Son
“If you have a heart, if you have a soul, Karen Hicks’ The Coming Woman will make you fall in love with Victoria Woodhull.” – Kinky Friedman, author & Governor of the Heart of Texas
“What kind of confidence would it take for a woman to buck the old boy’s club of politics in 1872? More than 140 years pre-Hillary, there was Victoria Woodhull. This book takes you back with a breathtaking, present-tense bird’s eye view into a time when women’s liberation was primarily confined to one woman’s very capable, independent mind. I couldn’t put it down.” – Ruth Buzzi, Golden Globe Award winner and Television Hall of Fame inductee
“The Coming Woman is a great read and a long overdue biography written beautifully by Ms. Hicks. Victoria Woodhull comes alive in each and every paragraph; a vital strength and spirit in Woodhull propels her to run for president of the United States when women weren’t even allowed to vote! What a woman, what a book! An inspiring must read for every woman and any adventurous men! Thank you, Ms. Hicks for finally telling her colorful story.” – Jennifer Lee Pryor, author of Tarnished Angel: A Memoir and President, Indigo, Inc.

 

Author Karen HicksAbout the Author:
Karen J. Hicks is retired and lives in Henderson, Nevada. She recently published her second novel, The Coming Woman, based on the life of the infamous feminist Victoria C. Woodhull, who was the first woman to run for U.S. President. Her first book was a self-help book titled The Tao of a Uncluttered Life. Karen served as in-house editor for author Steve Allen and has written several screenplays, as well as poetry, short stories, and essays. To learn more, go to Karen’s: Website | Facebook | Goodreads
For further information, to request a review copy of The Coming Woman, or to interview Karen, please contact Kelsey McBride at Book Publicity Services at info@bookpublicityservices.com or 805.807.9027.

 

Author Michael D. Dennis Announces Book Signing in West Hollywood, CA

a native's tongue book cover
August 13, 2014 (Los Angeles, CA) – Los Angeles based author Michael D. Dennis announced that he will be signing copies of his novel A Native’s Tongue and doing a reading at Book Soup in West Hollywood today, August 13, 2014 at 7:00PM.
A young man, torn between two women, struggles to find his way in the world in Michael D. Dennis’s touching new novel, A Native’s Tongue. Charlie Winters is used to just getting by while living with his single mother and working a dead-end job. Meanwhile, he’s constantly grappling with the voice of his sister, who died in a tragic car accident years earlier, echoing in his head. Soon Charlie finds himself immersed in a destructive relationship with an older woman who still fails to fill the void within him.
But then he meets Jennifer, whose energy and life convinces Charlie to pursue her-even through the darkest corners of Los Angeles. Escaping to the California coast, Charlie and Jennifer finally find what they’ve always needed. But a sudden illness quickly pulls them both back to LA. It is there, amid the sex, drugs, and split-second decisions that pulse through the city, that tragedy strikes-threatening to tear Charlie and Jennifer apart forever.
Love and tragedy collide in Dennis’s poignant new novel, A Native’s Tongue.
“Pages drenched with tears and blood that your eager eyes will soak up with impassioned avidity.” San Francisco Book Review
“Characters like Charlie, Violet and Jennifer—lost souls hoping to find themselves through someone else’s affection—is excellent, blistering drama. A memorable tale with direct, sincere characters…” – Kirkus Reviews
“An entertaining read with a surprisingly original plot… For those seeking an edgy novel with an ending that defies prediction, A Native’s Tongue is not to be missed.” – Annie Peters, ForeWord Reviews
A Native’s Tongue is available for sale on Amazon in ebook and paperback.
Book Soup is located at 8818 W Sunset Blvd, West Hollywood, CA 90069. For more information, go to http://www.booksoup.com/
For further information, to request a review copy of A Native’s Tongue, or to interview Michael, please contact Kelsey McBride at Book Publicity Services at info@bookpublicityservices.com or 805.807.9027.
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Michael D. Dennis at Book Soup

Dark Sun, Bright Moon by Oliver Sparrow

Dark Sun, Bright Moon by Oliver SparrowDark Sun, Bright Moon, by Oliver Sparrow, was published in July 2014 and is available for sale on Amazon. Genres: Historical Fiction / Fantasy
“Dark Sun, Bright Moon describes people isolated in the Andes, without the least notion of outsiders. The book explores events of a thousand years ago, events which fit with what we know of the region’s history,” says Sparrow.
Synopsis:
Human sacrifice, communities eaten from within, a vast mind blazing under the mud of Lake Titicaca; the rise and fall of empires cruel and kind.
In the Andes of a thousand years ago, the Huari empire is sick. Its communities are being eaten from within by a plague, a contagion that is not of the body but of something far deeper, a plague that has taken their collective spirit. Rooting out this parasite is a task that is laid upon Q’ilyasisa, a young woman from an obscure little village on the forgotten borders of the Huari empire.
This impossible mission is imposed on her by a vast mind, a sentience that has ambitions to shape all human life. Her response to this entails confrontations on sacrificial pyramids, long journeys through the Amazonian jungle and the establishment of not just one but two new empires. Her legacy shapes future Andean civilisation for the next four hundred years, until the arrival of the Spanish.

 

Excerpt from Dark Sun, Bright Moon:
Chapter 1: A Small Sacrifice at Pachacamac
A priest knelt before her, a feather from his head-dress tickling her face. His musky odour of old incense and stale blood was rank, even here on the windy summit of the pyramid. Four other priests held her body tipped slightly forwards, and the pressure that this put on her tired old joints hurt far more than the fine, cold bite of the knife at her neck. Quick blood ran thick down her chin and splashed into the waiting bowl. Then the flow weakened, the strength went out of her and she died, content
Seven elderly pilgrims had set out for Pachacamac, following their familiar river down to the coast and then trudging North through the desert sands. Two of the very oldest of them needed to be carried in litters, but most were able to walk with no more than a stick to help them in the sand. Lesser members of the community had been delegated to carry what was necessary. These would return home. The elderly would not.
The better-regarded families of the town were expected to die as was proper, sacrificed at the Pachacamac shrine for the betterment of the community. Such was to be their last contribution of ayni, of the reciprocity that assured communal harmony and health. It was also their guarantee of a smooth return to the community’s soul, to the deep, impersonal structure from which they had sprung at birth.
The Pachacamac complex appeared to them quite suddenly from amongst the coastal dunes. They paused to marvel at its mountain range of pyramids, its teeming myriad of ancient and holy shrines.
Over the millennia, one particular pyramid had come to process all of the pilgrims who came from their valley. They were duly welcomed, and guards resplendent in bronze and shining leather took them safely to its precinct.
They had been expected. The priests were kind, welcoming them with food and drink, helping the infirm, leading them all by easy stages up to the second-but-last tier in their great, ancient pyramid. The full extent of the meandering ancient shrine unveiled itself like a revelation as they climbed. Then, as whatever had been mixed with their meal took its effect, they were wrapped up snug in blankets and set to doze in the late evening sun, propped together against the warm, rough walls of the mud-brick pyramid. Their dreams were vivid, extraordinary, full of weight and meaning.
The group was woken before dawn, all of them muzzily happy, shriven of all their past cares, benignly numb. Reassuring priests helped them gently up the stairs to the very top tier. In the predawn light, the stepped pyramids of Pachacamac stood sacred and aloof in an ocean of mist.
Each pilgrim approached their death with confidence. A quick little discomfort would take them back to the very heart of the community from which they had been born. They had been separated from it by the act of birth, each sudden individual scattered about like little seed potatoes. Now, ripe and fruitful, they were about to return home, safely gathered back into the community store. It was to be a completion, a circle fully joined. Hundreds of conch horns brayed out across Pachacamac as the dawn sun glittered over the distant mountains. Seven elderly lives drained silently away as the mist below turned pink.

 

Author Oliver SparrowAbout the Author:
Oliver Sparrow was born in the Bahamas, raised in Africa and educated at Oxford to post-doctorate level, as a biologist with a strong line in computer science. He spent the majority of his working life with Shell, the oil company, which took him into the Peruvian jungle for the first time. He was a director at the Royal Institute for International Affairs, Chatham House for five years. He has started numerous companies, one of them in Peru, which mines for gold. This organisation funded a program of photographing the more accessible parts of Peru, and the results can be seen at http://www.all-peru.info. Oliver is the author of Dark Sun, Bright Moon. He knows modern Peru very well, and has visited all of the physical sites that are described in the bookTo learn more, go to DarkSunBrightMoon.com.
For further information, to request a review copy of Dark Sun, Bright Moon, or to interview Oliver Sparrow, please contact Kelsey McBride at Book Publicity Services at info@bookpublicityservices.com or 805.807.9027.